Translate

About the blog


This rambling blog is about building a simple layout in HO, the available space is rather small but the prototype was not built on the grand scale, most rural stations were merely a curved loop and a siding, which is easy to replicate.

Thursday, 9 May 2013

Pottendorf - a cameo exhibition layout


Pottendorf 1912

The layout represents a small rural station in Fränkische Schweiz in Oberfranken during 1912, just before the great Continental Empires ceased to exist. It is the dog days of a hot summer, everything has a fine layer of very pale yellowish dust, typical of a very dry August.

Essential information for exhibition managers:- 

Dimensions: 3,2m x 0.6m 
Operating space: 3,4 x 2m
Two operators
Operated from the rear
All components comply with HSE safety standards
All electrical equipment is annually PAT tested.


Expenses: No cost for vehicle hire, we request only travel costs from Dorset - 25p per mile.


Andy Hale - pottendorfho@gmail.com

Some pictures of our new model railway - Pottendorf











Our work has been published in numerous magazines such as Continental Modeller, LOCO-revue, MIBA and Eisenbahn Journal.

Previous layouts
Our first visit to Dortmund in 2003 with Schleching
Winner of the 'Most Authentic Layout' East Midlands Model Railway Show




Our last model railway
York in 2014 with The Quarry


1 comment:

  1. Excellent post, Tim.

    To take it a stage further, following conversations with a couple of friends who also model German railways, are the structures appropriate and consistent for a given region of Germany? the Prussian railway's 'style' differed quite a bit from, say, the Bavarian - station buildings, loco sheds, water towers and even water cranes can all clearly set the location as well as the era - too often layouts have a real mishmash of structures based (largely) on either easy availability or simply 'looks nice'!

    The track itself can also play a part, German track has a couple of interesting detail 'foibles' which make a difference if captured in miniature.

    ReplyDelete

Your comments are welcome but try not to be anonymous.